December 16, 2015

"Shepherds flock round the manger" by Pamela Mordecai

de Book of Mary



Shepherds flock round the manger

Den some shepherd, seven or eight of dem,
come round, say dem was in de field
wid dem flock and dem get a big fright

when a angel appear out of a great light
so bright likl most it blind dem.
And because dem did know

is Jah-Jah miracle, dem frighten for so!
But angel smile and say dem mustn’t fraid
for de good news him bring

going make people on earth
jump for joy. So of course,
everybody well eager to hear.

Angel say a baby just now born
into David city is Saviour,
Emmanuel, de Anointed One.

And him give dem a sign. Him say dem
going find de baby wrap up tight
in warm clothes lying down in a animal trough.

And same time a big crowd of angel
join up wid de first one. Dem all
praising God and singing,

“Glory to Jah up high in de heavens!
Peace to all down here pon de earth
dat please him!” Talk about a story!

Dem say soon as de angel dem gone
dem set out to look for de baby.
So me show dem my likl boy child,

him face smiling wid sense.
No pikni me know have two eye open so
studying de world right as him born!

All dis while me did glean wid my nose
de liklest shepherd was frighten so bad
him pee up himself. When dem reach,

him did come to de front to look on
de baby, den him hide at de back,
for him shame. So me call him, “Eli!”

(How me know de boy name, Jah to tell!)
“Come, Eli. You want hold de baby?”
When me hand him de child,

him look down on Jesus and him face
catch a fi re like somebody strike it
wid a flint. And same time

sweet algum fill de air
all around and boy and baby flare
in a bright candle glow.


de Book of Mary is now available @ Amazon:



de Book of Mary
 is an epic poem in Jamaican Creole based on the Biblical story of Mary, Joseph and Jesus. The first book of a trilogy, Pamela Mordecai's, de Book of Mary covers Mary's life from her early years, through the arrival of the Archangel Gabriel and the birth of Yeshua, to her death. 

A Chorus of male and female voices provides an accompanying commentary. This exciting Canadian-Jamaican retelling, profound and tragic, yet told with humour and gusto, is a major event, continuing Mordecai's project of hybridizing one of the most significant cultural-religious phenomena in world history. The last book of the trilogy, de Man, about the crucifixion of Jesus, was published by Sister Vision Press in 1995 and is now out of print. The poet is currently working on de book of Joseph, second 
book of the trilogy.


About Pamela Mordecai

Pamela ('Pam') Mordecai’s previous collections of poetry include Journey Poem (1989); de Man, a performance poem (1995); Certifiable (2001); The True Blue of Islands (2005), and Subversive Sonnets(2012). de book of Mary, from which “Jesus Takes Leave of Mary and Goes  into the Desert” comes, will appear in fall, 2015. In 2006 she published Pink Icing, a collection of short stories; her first novel, Red Jacket, appeared in February, 2015. 

She has edited and co-edited ground-breaking anthologies of Caribbean writing including Jamaica Woman (1980, 1985, with Mervyn Morris); From Our Yard: Jamaican Poetry since Independence (1987); Her True-True Name: An Anthology of Women's Writing from the Caribbean (1989, with Betty Wilson) and Calling Cards: New Poetry from Caribbean/ Canadian Women(2005). Her play, El Numero Uno had its world premiere at the Loraine Kimsa Theatre for Young People in Toronto in 2010. In spring 2014, she was a fellow at the prestigious Yaddo artists' community in upstate New York yaddo.org. Pam and her family immigrated to Canada in 1994. She lives with her husband, Martin, in Kitchener, Ontario




December 9, 2015

"Mary has a baby boy" by Pamela Mordecai

Pamela Mordecai


Mary has a baby boy

Well next thing you know,
de Roman emperor name Caesar
Augustus send out a instruction

dem must count all-o-we!
Dat time in Syria, one man name
Quirinius was governor.

Dem send orders dat every man jack
must find himself back to de town
where him born to write him name

down into a book. So Joseph
set off from Nazareth town where him live
in Galilee country and go to de city of David

what dem call Bethlehem, for is where
him family come from. Him take me
wid him, no mind me big wid baby,

for him say is him response for de two of we.
We leave Judith and Sarah
wid my ma and pa.

At de self same time when we reach
to Bethlehem, dis baby
decide him coming too.

Joseph ask for a room at de inn
but de place pack up right to de brim,
not one likl corner nor crack leave over.

Me sorry for Joseph! Him look high,
him look low till him find a stable and is dere
me born Jesus, wrap him in warm clothes,

give him a first taste of my breast,
and like how we never have no crib, settle him
in de dumb animal feeding box.


***

de Book of Mary is now available @ Amazon:




de Book of Mary is an epic poem in Jamaican Creole based on the Biblical story of Mary, Joseph and Jesus. The first book of a trilogy, Pamela Mordecai's 
de Book of Mary covers Mary's life from her early years, through the arrival of the Archangel Gabriel and the birth of Yeshua, to her death. 

A Chorus of male and female voices provides an accompanying commentary. This exciting Canadian-Jamaican retelling, profound and tragic, yet told with humour and gusto, is a major event, continuing Mordecai's project of hybridizing one of the most significant cultural-religious phenomena in world history. The last book of the trilogy, de Man, about the crucifixion of Jesus, was published by Sister Vision Press in 1995 and is now out of print. The poet is currently working on de book of Joseph, second book of the trilogy.


About Pamela Mordecai


Pamela ('Pam') Mordecai’s previous collections of poetry include Journey Poem (1989); de Man, a performance poem (1995); Certifiable (2001); The True Blue of Islands (2005), and Subversive Sonnets(2012). de book of Mary, from which “Jesus Takes Leave of Mary and Goes  into the Desert” comes, will appear in fall, 2015. In 2006 she published Pink Icing, a collection of short stories; her first novel, Red Jacket, appeared in February, 2015. She has edited and co-edited ground-breaking anthologies of Caribbean writing including Jamaica Woman (1980, 1985, with Mervyn Morris); From Our Yard: Jamaican Poetry since Independence (1987); Her True-True Name: An Anthology of Women's Writing from the Caribbean (1989, with Betty Wilson) and Calling Cards: New Poetry from Caribbean/ Canadian Women(2005). Her play, El Numero Uno had its world premiere at the Loraine Kimsa Theatre for Young People in Toronto in 2010. In spring 2014, she was a fellow at the prestigious Yaddo artists' community in upstate New York yaddo.org. Pam and her family immigrated to Canada in 1994. She lives with her husband, Martin, in Kitchener, Ontario.

November 16, 2015

My Ideal Schedule: Miami Book Fair International


Miami Book Fair



To create your own schedule, visit: http://miamibookfair.com/


November 13, 2015

The Miami Book Fair International, 2015



More than 200 national and international book exhibitors and publishers, bestselling authors, artists, entertainers, and food vendors will participate in the Street Fair Weekend as part of the 32nd Miami Book Fair,  the largest and finest literary event in the U.S., presented by Miami Dade College (MDC). The Street Fair runs Friday – Sunday, Nov. 20 – 22, from 10 a.m. - 6 p.m.


The Street Fair brings together all the elements of the Fair during one jam-packed weekend! In addition to the more than 200 publishers and exhibitors, there will be book presentations and readings by some of the world’s most celebrated authors and poets, representing various genres and in multiple languages. The Swamp, a pop-up lounge and stage, and The Porch, the central gathering place for the Fair, will feature round-the-clock performances, live music, poetry readings, theater, and more. In addition, there are literacy and learning activities for children/tweens/teens during Generation Genius Days and The Kitchen will offer demos and panels for food enthusiasts in partnership with the MDC’s Miami Culinary Institute. The International Food Court at the southeast corner of 3rd St. and 1st Ave. will offer a variety of treats, including shish kabobs, frozen lemonade, crepes, ice cream, and more.   

This year, the Fair will also host several celebrities, including John Leguizamo, Rosie Perez, Paul Giammatti, Jesse Eisenberg, and Kunal Nayyar, as well as hip-hop legends Luther “Uncle Luke” Campbell, Christopher “Fresh Kid Ice" Wong Won and FAB 5 FREDDY, among others.

Admission to the Street Fair is free Friday, Nov. 20. General admission Saturday and Sunday, Nov. 21 – 22, is $8; admission for those 13-18 or over 62 is $5; those 12 and under are admitted free. The Street Fair will be located on N.E. 2nd Ave. between N. 3rd St. and N. 5th St., and along adjacent side streets. The Street Fair is presented with the generous support of OHL Arellano Construction.  

"OHL-Arellano takes pride in giving back to the community by supporting the Miami Book Fair, internships, philanthropic and educational programs,” said Alicia Cuervo, Regional Director for OHL-Arellano Construction. “We believe that philanthropic endeavors are the private sectors' opportunity to look at our past for lessons and inspiration while looking forward to successful projects and events like the Miami Book Fair that enrich our community.

For a complete list of Street Fair exhibitors and activities, please visit the Miami Book Fair site and download the printable guide at www.miamibookfair.com..

November 2, 2015

The North Coast Writing Retreat: Grande Riviére, Trinidad, 7-10th January, 2016



The course is a three-day intensive which will include master classes in life writing, with Monique Roffey, and poetry, with Loretta Collins Klobah.

Held on the Caribbean island of Trinidad, the retreat is for writers who have experience of work-shopping their work, and have either been published or are working towards publication. Morning workshops will be given over to poetry and afternoons will be centered on life writing. The two strands of writing workshops are intended to weave together and complement each other. There will also be time to work on your own writing, and evenings will feature readings from students and discussions about the creative writing process. The course is open to 16 participants.

APPLICATION GUIDELINES

To apply, 1) submit either two poems or 2000 words of life writing (or both) and 2) a short resume of your writing experience to date to moniqueroffey@gmail.com Once your application has been accepted, booking is done via Mt. Plaisir Estate Hotel, Grande Riviére at maktoub@mac.com. You will need to liaise with Piero Guerrini at Mt. Plaisir Estate Hotel, for transport from Piarco International Airport, Trinidad, to Grande Riviére.  A welcome dinner at the hotel is at 7 p.m. on Thursday night, 7th January, and we will start out first informal session at 8:30 pm. Please aim to be at the hotel in time for the Thursday night dinner.

The cost of the retreat is $TT 900 per day (including tuition, accommodation and meals) or $TT2700 for three days (£280 British pounds or USD $420 in total). Accommodation is shared and en suite. Single occupancy will be available at an added cost.

About the tutors:

Both tutors have many years of teaching experience.


Loretta Collins Klobah is poet and professor of Creative Writing and Caribbean Literature at the University of Puerto Rico in San Juan. She has published poems in many regional and international literary journals. Her poetry collection, The Twelve-Foot Neon Woman received the 2012 OCM Bocas Award for Caribbean Literature in the category of poetry (Trinidad and Tobago). It was also one of five books shortlisted for the 2012 Felix Dennis Prize, offered by Forward Arts Foundation in the UK. She has received a Pushcart Prize and the Earl Lyons Award from the American Academy of Poets.


Monique Roffey is a writer and creative writing tutor, who has taught at COSTAATT in Port of Spain, Goldsmiths College, London, for the Guardian/UEA Master classes, The Arvon Foundation and privately in Trinidad. She is the author of four novels and a memoir. Her third novel Archipelago won the OCM Bocas Award for Caribbean Literature in 2013. She has also been short-listed for the Orange Prize, the Encore Award, the Orion Award and the Costa Fiction Prize in 2015. Her work sells in the UK, Caribbean, USA and has been translated into five languages.


Mt. Plaisir Estate is a world-renowned eco-lodge on the north coast of Trinidad. Behind the hotel, there is a small village and rain forest and in front of the hotel is a half-mile of white beach, the nesting destination of thousands of leatherback turtles every year. For more see www.mtplaisir.com


October 14, 2015

Forthcoming Young Adult novel by Diana McCaulay


Papillote Press is delighted to announce the forthcoming publication of Gone to Drift by the award-winning Jamaican writer Diana McCaulay. This young adult novel, which won second prize in the CODE’s Burt Award for Caribbean Literature (2015), will be published on 29 February 2016.
Gone to Drift tells the story of a 12-year-old Jamaican boy, Lloyd, and his search for his beloved grandfather, a fisherman who is lost at sea. An adventure story about a boy confronted with difficult moral choices it will inspire its readers to choose bravery over cowardice and to follow their hearts. 
"This is my first novel for young adults," says McCaulay, "and as reading meant so much to me as a teenager, I'm hoping Gone to Drift will be read and enjoyed by many Caribbean young people. I wanted to pay tribute to our long tradition of fishermen, and I'm so grateful the Burt Award has made that possible. I'm also thrilled that Gone to Drift will be published by Papillote Press, a Caribbean publishing house which I've long admired." 
Gone to Drift follows on from McCaulay’s two acclaimed novels, Dog-Heart (2010) and Huracan (2012) and is built on her 2012 Regional Commonwealth prize-winning short story, The Dolphin Catchers  (Granta Online). As well as writing, McCaulay founded and, for many years, ran the Jamaica Environment Trust (JET); she was also a popular newspaper columnist. 
As Pamela Mordecai, author of The Red Jacket, sa ys: "Gone to Drift  is a love story about Lloyd's deep affection for his grandfather, and about the author's deep love for Jamaica, its land and seas. A Jamaican coming-of-age story - realistic, often funny and deeply touching - it’s a story for adventurous boys and girls, and for grownups too." 
CODE's Burt Award for Caribbean Literature is an annual award given to English-language literary works for young adults (aged 12 through 18) written by Caribbean authors. Established by CODE - a Canadian NGO that has been supporting literacy and learning for over 55 years - with the generous support of the Literary Prizes Foundation and in partnership with the Bocas Lit Fest, the Award aims to provide  engaging and culturally relevant books for young people across the Caribbean.
Founded in 2011, the Bocas Lit Fest administers major literary prizes for Caribbean authors and organises the annual NGC Bocas Lit Fest, Trinidad and Tobago’s premier literary festival.
Papillote Press, based in Dominica and London, specialises in books about Dominica and the wider Caribbean. “I love this story. It entwines a tale of modern Jamaica with memories of the old ways of the sea. The reader follows Lloyd’s desperate search for his grandfather every step of the way.” says Polly Pattullo, publisher of Papillote Press.
For further information please contact the publisher: info@papillotepress.co.uk

August 21, 2015

Excerpt from "de book of Mary" by Pamela Mordecai

Pamela Mordecai



JESUS TAKES LEAVE OF MARY AND GOES INTO THE DESERT

Plenty hard to believe my son turn
thirty dis winter season just gone!
Not dat me never watch

every minute, each day, as him grow.
But is like you see and you don’t notice,
and den, all of a sudden dis big

somebody hold you face in him hand
kiss you on you forehead,
say, “Mums, I going now.”

Never mind how much time
I protest and ask why him must go
off alone to a place wid no water, no food,

not a green thing to lift him spirit...
“Mums,” him say “why I would
leave dis house, you and Gran, best cook food

in dis town, my sistren and bredren,
and de whole family, plus de woodworking, too,
all I love, if it was up to me?”

I breathe deep, gaze on him
from him head to him toe, one last time.
“See three loaf of new bread I just bake

in dat bag, and a wineskin your gran
send wid Judith daughter dis morning.
She say, send, tell her when you going.

“I going stop by de yard
as I leaving, to tell Gran goodbye.
Big thanks for de eats and de drink,

but you know my food in de wild
going be fasting and prayer, my Mums.
I sure you don’t want my Papa up so...”

and him turn him eye up to de sky,
“to vex wid me right as I start out?”
“Why you can’t pray here, son?

I will keep food and drink far from you.
I will honour your fast. Is a thing I do for
Joseph plenty times when him was still wid us.”

Him bend down and kiss me,
say, “Mums, dis not de worst.
Me must get ready for some dread things.”

When I go to answer, him put one finger on
my lip. “Hush, Mums,” him repeat,
“believe me, if de choosing was mine

I would stay.”
And him look round de room,
touch de big water jug, scuff de rug

wid him foot, take him staff
and walk through de door –
never turn him head round to look back.


From de book of Mary




Pam Mordecai


About Pamela Mordecai

Pamela ('Pam') Mordecai’s previous collections of poetry include Journey Poem (1989); de Man, a performance poem (1995); Certifiable (2001); The True Blue of Islands (2005), and Subversive Sonnets (2012). de book of Mary, from which “Jesus Takes Leave of Mary and Goes  into the Desert” comes, will appear in fall, 2015. In 2006 she published Pink Icing, a collection of short stories; her first novel, Red Jacket, appeared in February, 2015. She has edited and co-edited ground-breaking anthologies of Caribbean writing including Jamaica Woman (1980, 1985, with Mervyn Morris); From Our Yard: Jamaican Poetry since Independence (1987); Her True-True Name: An Anthology of Women's Writing from the Caribbean (1989, with Betty Wilson) and Calling Cards: New Poetry from Caribbean/ Canadian Women (2005). Her play, El Numero Uno had its world premiere at the Loraine Kimsa Theatre for Young People in Toronto in 2010. In spring 2014, she was a fellow at the prestigious Yaddo artists' community in upstate New York yaddo.org. Pam and her family immigrated to Canada in 1994. She lives with her husband, Martin, in Kitchener, Ontario.

August 19, 2015

Deadline Extended: Interviewing the Caribbean (IC)

Opal Palmer Adisa


Interviewing the Caribbean (IC)—has been founded by Jamaican poet and educator Opal Palmer Adisa. IC seeks poems, stories, creative non-fiction, and visual art in all media that celebrate Caribbean life. Caribbean artists at home and in the Diaspora are invited to participate. Submit by September 5, 2015u, to be included in the inaugural issue along with Junot Diaz, Leroy Clarke, Tamara Natalie Madden, and others. The topic for the inaugural issue is “Intellectual Property” (IP).

Description: “All too often, when it comes to intellectual property, black artists are the ones who lose the rights to their work (The Root, LaToya Peterson, May 15, 2011). Who owns your work? Does it matter? Many are the black creators who have not reaped the monetary benefits of their success. How do you, as a creative voice, ensure that ownership of your work—and the royalties that go with it—accrues to you? In recent years, prominent black artists—and their estates—have challenged intellectual property misappropriation in the courts.

Some well-known cases: The artist formerly known as Prince did battle with Warner Bros. Records for years before winning back ownership of the master tapes for his hit albums. Just this year, Marvin Gaye’s estate challenged Pharrell Williams and Robin Thicke on the similarity of their song “Blurred Lines” and Gaye’s “Got to Give it Up”—and won.

Some possibilities to consider: How is the concept of IP experienced by Caribbean artists—writers, visual artists, musicians, and others? How are ideas about IP evolving in Caribbean society at large? What is the future for intellectual property rights for artists in the Caribbean context? (Works that cover other, but related, themes will be considered.)

Please send submissions of writing as Word documents. Visual artists, please send photographs as jpegs at 300 dpi resolution. 

Submit via email to interviewingthecaribbean@gmail.com.

August 18, 2015

A List of Poetry Books by Jamaican Authors


Jamaican Poets


By Kwame Dawes

After my survey of Jamaican poetry appeared last week, I received many calls from people about how to get hold of some of the key titles by Jamaican poets. Of course, many of the works of these poets are long out of print, but there is a rich range and body of poetry that is still in print and that would reward the time and resources spent to acquire them. Needless to say, this list is an edited list - meaning it is selective and somewhat, though guardedly, subjective. It is, in other words, hardly comprehensive in the same way that the survey was not. It will reflect embarrassing omissions, and for those I apologise in advance.

There are a number of anthologies that feature Jamaican poetry that will offer an even broader range of work to supplement what I have listed here. And for those who are interested in watching some of the poets in action, I strongly encourage you to search out names on YouTube, where most of these poets do appear performing their work. Of special interest in that regard would be anything by Mikey Smith, Jean Binta Breeze, Linton Kwesi Johnson, Owen Blakka Ellis, Lillian Allen, Michael St George, and Staceyann Chin, to name just a few. Finally, a great resource would be The Poetry Archive in the UK, where some of our major poets are featured: (http://www.poetryarchive.org/poet [2]).

JAMAICAN POETRY BOOK SAMPLER
Olive Senior Gardening in the Tropics (Idiomatic, Canada, 2009)
Tony McNeill Chinese Lanterns from the Blue Child (Peepal Tree, UK, 1998)
Lorna Goodison Controlling the Silver (University of Michigan Press, 2006)
George Campbell First Poems (Peepal Tree Press, UK, 2011)
LKJ - Selected Poems (Penguin, UK, 2006)
Geoffrey Philp Florida Bound (Peepal Tree UK, 1998)
Tanya Shirley She Who Sleeps with Bones (Peepal Tree, UK, 2009)
Mervyn Morris - I Been There Sort Of: New and Selected Poems (Carcanet, UK, 2006)
Dennis Scott - Uncle Time (University of Pittsburg Press, US, 1973)
Ishion Hutchison - Far District (Peepal Tree, UK, 2010)
Ann Margaret Lim - Festival of Wild Orchid (Peepal Tree UK, 2013)
Edward Baugh - It Was the Singing (Sandberry Press, JA, 2000)
Velma Pollard - Shame Trees Don't Grow Here (Peepal Tree UK, 1992)
SharaMacallum - The Face of Water: New and Selected Poems (Peepal Tree, UK, 2011)
Jean Binta Breeze - Spring Cleaning (Virago, UK, 1992)
Donna Aza Weir Soley - First Rain (Peepal Tree, 2006)
Millicent Graham - The Damp in Things (Peepal Tree, 2009)
Colin Channer - Providential (Akashic Books, US/ Peepal Tree, UK, 2015)
Kei Miller - Cartographer Tries to Map a Way to Zion (Carcanet, UK 2014)
Mutabaruka - The Next Poems/The First Poems (Paul Issa Publications, 2005)
Neville Dawes - Fugue and Other Writings (Peepal Tree, 2012)
Louise Bennet - Aunty Roachy Seh: Selected Poems (Sangster, 1993
Claude McKay - Complete Poems (University of Illinois, US, 2014)
Mark McMorris - Entrepot (Coffee House Press, US, 2010)
Benjamin Zephaniah Too Black, Too Strong (Bloodaxe Books, UK, 2001)
Pamela Mordecai - Subversive Sonnets (TSAR Publications, Canada, 2012)
Louis Simpson - Struggling Times (BOA US, 2009)
Marcia Douglas - Electricity Cone to Cocoa Bottom (Peepal Tree, UK, 1999)
Opal Palmer Adisa - 4-Headed Woman (Tia Chucha Press, US, 2013)
Ralph Thompson - View from Mount Diablo (Peepal Tree, UK, 2003)
Claudia Rankine - Citizen: An American Lyric (Graywolf Press, US, 2014)

Poetry books by Jamaican authors
http://jamaica-gleaner.com/article/art-leisure/20150809/poetry-books-jamaican-authors#.VckNg38ZinY.mailto


August 17, 2015

Happy Birthday, Marcus Garvey!




Harlem, 1918

Passing him in the street, you'd never believe
that this "sawed-off hammered down black man,"
standing on a ladder so he could see above the crowd,
could lift thousands of black men, hard men, dice

men, to their feet-- that this round-faced Negro, 
who looked as if he hadn't eaten anything 
but "sardines, salmon and beans" from a can, 
and with shoes so cracked, you could lose a week's 

pay in the holes. But when he growled 
like one of those Hoodoo men from New Orleans, 
and stretched out his arms as welcoming as the mouth
of the Mississippi, he could have led us through Harlem

to the Nile, and we would have followed him past the white
men's rage when he said, "Rise up, ye, mighty people. Accomplish 
what you will," then, we rejoined, "Speak, Garvey, speak,"
and the Holy Spirit descended on the congregation.


From my forthcoming collection of poems, LETTER FROM MARCUS GARVEY

August 10, 2015

On My Bookshelf: Providential by Colin Channer

Colin Channer

Channer’s debut poetry collection achieves an intimate and lyric meditation on family, policing, loss, and violence, but the work is enlivened by humour, tenderness, and the rich possibilities that come from honest reflection. Combined with a capacity to offer physical landscapes with painterly sensitivity and care, a graceful mining of the nuances of Jamaican patwa and American English, and a judicious use of metaphor and similie, Providential is a work of “heartical” insight and vulnerability.

No one, since Claude McKay’s folksy Constab Ballads of 1912, has attempted to tackle the unlikely literary figure of the Jamaican policeman. Now, over a century later, drawing on his own family knowledge of the world of the police, on the complex dynamic of his relationship with his father, and framed within the humane principles of Rasta and reggae, Channer has both explored the colonial origins of that police culture and brought us up to date in necessary ways. Here are poems that manage to turn the complex relationships between a man and his father, a man and his mother, and man and his country and a man and his children, into something akin to grace. Providential does not read like a novelist’s one-off flirtation with poetry, but an accomplished overture to what ought to be a remarkable literary journey for a writer of immense talent and versatility.

“…Written with pitch-perfect rhythm and a keen eye for supple, limber turns.” —Lorna Goodison, author of From Harvey River

“Channer writes with a moving vulnerability and much lyric grace, revealing new facets to familiar themes—home, family, history, and the evolving journey of self. A universal, timeless meditation.”
—Chris Abani, author of The Secret History of Las Vegas

Born in Jamaica to a pharmacist and cop. Colin Channer is named by Junot Díaz calls him “one of the Caribbean Diaspora’s finest writers.”